Boat Trailers

There are two trailer options for the Sage 17: standard and deluxe.

The standard trailer is an ‘off the shelf’ type provided by Pacific Boat Trailers.  ‘Off the self’, in this case, means the framing and bunks were not designed specifically for the Sage 17.  The bunks on the standard trailer are adjustable, meaning the trailer can be used to transport most shoal keeled sailboats about 17′ long.  A fully galvanized frame is standard with stainless steel hardware holding all ‘non-welded’ parts to the frame.  The axle is leaf-spring, lighting is incandescent bulbs, wheels are 13″ and the hubs are protected with BearingBuddy greasing system.

AIR BORN on her 'old' standard trailer.  Look at the boat's height above ground in this picture v. the picture below of Sage 17 ALIDA on a deluxe difference.

Sage 17 AIR BORN on her ‘old’ standard trailer. Look at the boat’s height above ground in this picture v. the picture below of Sage 17 ALIDA on a deluxe trailer.

The deluxe trailer was custom designed to fit the Sage 17.  I call the frame ‘low rider’ as it sets the boat over 1′ lower to the ground than the standard trailer design.  Because the boat is sitting within the trailer’s frame the steel is thicker and crossbeams larger.  Like the standard trailer the frame is galvanized and all parts not welded to the frame are attached using stainless steel fasteners.  All the trailer lights are LED, suspension is a torsion axle, wheels are 14″, hubs are protected using the Vault system, and tongue has an integrated 60″ extension.  The deluxe trailer can also be ordered with a boarding ladder making it easier to get up on the boat.

Sage 17 on a Deluxe trailer.  In this case the tow vehicle is a Volkswagen Touareg.

Sage 17 on a Deluxe trailer. In this case the tow vehicle is a Volkswagen Touareg.

Trailer boarding ladder on a Sage 17 deluxe trailer.

Trailer boarding ladder, just aft of the spare tire, on a Sage 17 deluxe trailer.

The deluxe trailer is about 400 pounds heavier than the standard trailer because of the stronger frame, torsion axle, and larger wheels.

In choosing between the standard and deluxe trailer a Sage 17 owner needs to look at the following –

  • a Sage 17 on a deluxe trailer will fit through a standard 7′ high garage opening; an important consideration for an owner wanting to store the boat indoors.
  • as noted before the Sage 17 sits a foot lower on the deluxe trailer making her easier to launch and retrieve.
  • with the integrated tongue extension on the deluxe trailer one needs not worry about getting the tow vehicle wet when launching and retrieving.
  • how much trailer/boat weight can the tow vehicle handle?  A standard Sage 17 on a standard trailer weighs about 1800 pounds.  A standard Sage 17 on a deluxe trailer weighs between 2200 and 2300 pounds.
  • do you want the trailer boarding ladder?  The ladder is only available with the deluxe trailer.

Both trailers are excellent to tow.  The trailer AIR BORN, the demo Sage 17, used for over two years was the standard model.  This trailer has about 20,000 or so miles on the wheels with not a problem … including driving through many a high cross-wind situations and salt water launchings.  I have towed over 100,000 with the deluxe trailers with not a problem.

The trailers are built in Chino, California.  Every three or four months trailers are collected and driven, stacked three or four high, back to Sage Marine in Golden, Colorado.

Three deluxe Sage 17 trailers stacked for transportation.

Three deluxe Sage 17 trailers stacked for transportation.

Pacific Trailers, even the standard model, are not a low cost trailer.  These are high quality overbuilt vehicles that will provide, in my opinion, a lifetime of service if a basic maintenance regiment is followed (more on this later).

Speaking of later … this discussion is ‘part one’ of a series of posts I’ll do about boat trailers.  The next discussion will cover my ideas on securing a boat for trailing and safely driving with a boat in tow.

– Dave

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