One week until the 2017 October Annapolis show!

Starting on 5 October Sage Marine will be at our usual place, Land Sites 80 & 81, at the Annapolis Sailboat Show.  The show runs until 9 October 2017.

Sage Marine Annapolis Show location

A Sage 17 and SageCat will be attending.  Let us know if you wish to see the boats!

Following the show, 10 & 11 October, by appointment, there will be SageCat demo sails.  If you want to sail a SageCat let us know by sending an email to info@sagemarine.com

See all’ya’all in Annapolis!

Sage 15 progress: cabin and deck

this past week has been busy for Matt and Jerry –

Bonding the liner in place.

The sides where the liner is resting against the hull were bonded before.  Now the edges where the liner and hull don’t touch are bonded.

Jerry working on the under cockpit bulkhead and stringers.

Jerry working on the under cockpit bulkhead and stringers.

Under cockpit supports have been coated in resin and fully tabbed into place. Next the structure is fully covered in gel coat.

Under cockpit supports have been coated in resin and fully tabbed into place. Next the structure is fully covered in gel coat.

Jerry bonding the aft edge of the liner in place.

Jerry bonding the aft edge of the liner in place.

The cabin setup is complete –

The interior teak cut and teak oiled prior to install.

The interior teak cut and teak oiled prior to install.

Interior teak being installed.

Interior teak being installed.

Interior teak installed.

Interior teak installed.

The deck hardware has mostly been installed –

Matt sanding off the sharp edge after cutting out the companionway opening.

Matt sanding off the sharp edge after cutting out the companionway opening.

Foredeck hardware.

Foredeck hardware.

Matt installing cabintop hardware.

Matt installing cabintop hardware.

Starboard side of the cabintop hardware in place and the cabin window installed (the portlight is the same as the aft portlight on the Sage 17).

Starboard side of the cabintop hardware in place and the cabin window installed (the portlight is the same as the aft portlight on the Sage 17).

Installing the companionway teak.

Installing the companionway teak.

The final steps are now being done so the hull and deck can be bonded together –

Jerry laying out the locations for the transom hardware. Standard are the outboard motor mount, gudgeons and boarding ladder.

Jerry laying out the locations for the transom hardware. Standard are the outboard motor mount, gudgeons and boarding ladder.

Deck raised up so can be put onto hull.

Deck raised up so can be put onto hull.

The deck is set on the hull and final fit is confirmed.

The deck is set on the hull and final fit is confirmed.

– Dave

Sage 15 deck and cockpit up close

Pictures of the Sage 15 deck –

Foredeck.

Foredeck.

Starboard side of house portlight opening.

Starboard side of house portlight opening.  This identical to the aft portlight used on the Sage 17.

The cockpit –

Cockpit.

Cockpit.

Cockpit lockers. The openings are identical in size to those on the Sage 17.

Cockpit lockers. The openings are identical in size to those on the Sage 17.

The hull liner (aka, cabin interior) –

Hull liner being removed from the mold.

Hull liner being removed from the mold.

Matt cutting out the v-berth locker openings.

Matt cutting out the v-berth locker openings.

– Dave

Parts migration

Next week Matt heads to Jerry Montgomery’s shop in Sacramento, CA, to collect the Sage 15 tooling.

Utility trailer ready for the trip to Sacramento, CA.

Utility trailer ready for the trip to Sacramento, CA.

Once Matt, Jerry and the ‘big big trailer’ return to Golden the first, prototype, Sage 15 will begin assembly in preparation for her premier at the Annapolis Sailboat Show 8 – 12 October 2015. (If you wish to see the Sage 15 at the show let us know:  info@sagemarine.com or call 800-621-1065)

The first deck and hull liner are almost completed.   Like her big sister, the Sage 17, the Sage 15’s deck is carbon fiber.   Sage 15’s interior has a v-berth forward (longer than the Sage 17s!) and two inboard facing sitting headroom seats (like the Sage 17).

Jerry is also putting the finishing touches on the remaining component molds: companionway slider hatch, daggerboard, daggerboard trunk and the catboat Sage 15’s (aka, SageCat) carbon fiber tabernacle base for the rotating mast.

The Sage 15's daggerboard trunk plug (used to make the mold). This part will be 'hidden' under the v-berth leaving the cabin sole completely unobstructed.

The Sage 15’s daggerboard trunk plug (used to make the mold). This part will be ‘hidden’ under the v-berth leaving the cabin sole completely unobstructed.

Late August and September will be busy at Sage Marine.  Watch this space for updates and pictures!

– Dave

Varnishing Part 2

In this post I will outline my process for finish varnishing the Sage 17 rudders. (read part one here.)

After each rudder has received their undercoat of Interlux Jet Speed they are ready for at least three coats of Interlux Compass Clear.  Compass is a UV stabilized varnish, unlike Interlux Jet Speed, and will protect the wood from sun damage.

First the rudders are sanded, lightly, with 220 grit paper.  The slight amount of varnish you are sanding should come off in a fine dust.  If the varnish is coming off in ‘gooey balls’ it isn’t dry.  Stop, wait six hours, and see if the varnish is dry.

Use 220 grit sandpaper between each coat of varnish.

Use 220 grit sandpaper between each coat of varnish.

Use a tack rag to remove the dust and then wipe down the rudders with a shop towel damp with Interlux 333.

The varnish is applied using smooth strokes.  I work in 6″-9″ sections from one end of the rudder to the other.  Work quickly to assure you keep a wet edge.

Use smooth stokes while applying varnish.  Work quickly to assure you keep a wet edge.

Use smooth stokes while applying varnish. Work quickly to assure you keep a wet edge.

Once the top is varnished I run the brush along the edges.  I don’t wet the brush in varnish, I do this step with a ‘damp brush’ just after completing the last section of the rudder’s top.

Run the brush along the edges, or sides, of the rudder.

Run the brush along the edges, or sides, of the rudder.

brushing 2

Don’t forget to bush along the bottom of the rudder.

Now I smooth the varnish on the top of the rudder.  I use long slow strokes going from bottom to the head of the rudder.

HINT:

  • When using a foam brush it is important to go slow with these final strokes; if you move quickly the brush can ‘chatter’ or ‘hop’ along the surface.  If moving slowly the brush still chatters dip just the end of the foam chip into varnish to make it just damp.

If you look at the surface just after doing these final ‘finish strokes’ you will see slight brush marks.  These should settle out in a couple of minutes.

MORE HINTS:

  • If the varnish has thickened in the can the brush marks may not settle out.  After this coat drys, sand out the marks and thin the varnish.  For Compass thin no more than 15% with Interlux 333.
  • It is also possible to apply the varnish in too thin a layer, meaning applied to little varnish.  This will also leave brush makes.  After the coat drys sand out the marks and apply another coat just a bit more thickly.

At this stage of varnishing you have multiple coats to apply and it is not a problem to sand out a mistake as your skill at making a smooth finish coat improves.

Now use a shop towel that is damp with Interlux 333 to wipe the lower edge of the rudder sides.

Wipe along the bottom edge of the sides with a dampened, with Interlux 333, shop towel to clean up any drips.

Wipe along the bottom edge of the sides with a shop towel dampened with Interlux 333 to clean up any drips.

Allow the varnish to dry, flip the rudders over, and apply a coat of varnish.  I find that Compass takes about 6-8 hours to be dry enough to flip over the rudder and do the ‘back side’ (bonus the shop being in Golden, Colorado, is the low humidity and quick dry times).  to fully dry Compass takes about 18-24 hours.

Once both sides of the rudder are dry sand again with 220 grit paper, dust, clean and varnish.  A minimum of two more coats needs to be applied (giving a minimum total of six coats).

Now you inspect the rudder.  Are you happy with the finish?  If yes you are done.  If not sand, dust, clean and apply another coat.

HINT:

  • For a super smooth final coat sand the prior coat with 400 grit paper instead of 220 grit.  Be sure to clean off ALL the dust before applying that final perfect coat of varnish.
Two rudders nicely varnished and ready to be installed into the rudder/tiller assembly.

Two rudders nicely varnished and ready to be installed into the rudder/tiller assembly.

That outlines to steps used here at Sage Marine to get the rudders ‘nice a pretty’.  The entire process takes a week … thought the time spent sanding and varnishing is only 20 – 30 minutes each day.

– Dave